Safety, Health and Wellbeing

Eyewash and emergency showers

Our role is to develop and assist in the implementation of the UWA safety, health and wellbeing programs in order to minimise the risk of injury, illness and property damage.

We provide consultancy and other services to promote best practice and legislative compliance in all University and related activities.

Legislation specifically requires employers to provide and maintain personal protective equipment.

It is also a requirement that employees are trained in the use of such equipment and that they are supervised.

Where it is not practicable to avoid the presence of hazards at the workplace, the employer must provide employees with adequate personal protective equipment and clothing as is practicable to protect them from those hazards, without any cost to the employee. (Australian Standards, Safety in Laboratories; General; Part 1, AS/NZS 2243.1. Section 2; Laboratory Design and Safety).

Statutory Legislation

Legislation specifically requires employers to provide and maintain personal protective equipment. It is also a requirement that employees are trained in the use of such equipment and that they are supervised.

Where it is not practicable to avoid the presence of hazards at the workplace, the employer must provide employees with adequate personal protective equipment and clothing as is practicable to protect them from those hazards, without any cost to the employee. (Australian Standards, Safety in Laboratories; General; Part 1, AS/NZS 2243.1. Section 2; Laboratory Design and Safety)

Policy

  1. A permanently fixed aerated eye wash facility which can be operated without using hands is necessary in each room where chemicals, corrosives or flammable substances are handled.
  2. At least one safety shower should be installed where chemical, corrosive or flammable substances are used. NOTE: This may be a drench-type shower, a hand-held spray, or other type as appropriate to the hazard of the particular laboratory. There should not be more than a 10-metre travel distance to such devices from any point in the laboratory. These devices and their actuating mechanism should be located so that the approach to them is unobstructed.
 

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Last updated:
Wednesday, 13 January, 2016 11:04 AM

http://www.safety.uwa.edu.au/1925656